Hoya Plant Care: How to Grow Our Top 5 Cultivars

Posted on Jan 12, 2015

If you remember a vine creeping around your grandmother’s kitchen, chances are it was a Hoya plant. This tropical indoor plant — often called a “Wax plant” due to its thick waxy leaves — is a classic because it lives forever, grows to be enormous, and creates beautiful, porcelain-like fragrant flower clusters (it’s also often called “Porcelain flower”).

Though many swear Hoya plant care is among the easiest of all indoor plants, we’ve cared for many Hoyas in the nursery over the years, and have learned that each has its specific likes and dislikes. Here are 5 of our favorite Hoya cultivars and their care requirements. We’ll move through from most to least common, so you can master the ins and outs of Hoya plant care. Plus, we’ll share a tip to induce blossoming!

Hoya Plant care for our five favorite cultivars

Our 5 favorite Hoya cultivars

1 – Hoya carnosa (top left)

Why it’s special: This is the classic wax plant from your childhood. Dark green, large, almond-shaped leaves grow on long vines, which will eventually put out creamy flower clusters.
What it likes: medium to bright indirect light. Less is more when it comes to watering; we like to wait until the leaves pucker slightly.
What it dislikes: Direct sun, artificial light, dark corners.

2 – Hoya carnosa variegata ‘Tricolor’ (top middle)

Why it’s special: Everything you love about the classic carnosa, but with leaves lined in white and pink, in addition to the green. Occasionally, this Hoya will have stems of bright pink and will shoot out solid white leaves. A stunner.
What it likes: This is one of the pickier Hoyas. It needs very bright, but indirect light, to thrive. Also enjoys heat and high humidity. Follow watering procedure for normal carnosa, above.
What it dislikes: Low-medium light, cold drafty windows. Particularly sensitive to over-watering. Portlanders, be sure you have a bright enough spot to keep this one happy!

3 – Hoya carnosa ‘Rubra’ aka ‘Crimson prince’ (bottom right)

Why it’s special: sometimes called Krimson princess or krimson queen, this Hoya carnosa cultivar has variegated foliage that includes cream, yellow, and pink, in addition to bright green.
What it likes: Like its variegated cousin, the tricolor, this Hoya needs a bright spot where it won’t receive direct sun. Water like a carnosa.
What it dislikes: Low-medium light, cold drafty windows. Particularly sensitive to overwatering.

4 – Hoya obovata (top right)

Why it’s special: this Hoya has incredible dark green, round, lightly speckled leaves. Compared to many Hoyas, this one is relatively fast to grow and sets flower earlier than most.
What it likes: This is one of the hardier Hoyas we’ve encountered. It still wants bright light, but is tolerant of medium light.
What it dislikes: Over-watering; those big leaves hold a lot of water. Wait until it puckers before watering. Also dislikes direct sun, and dark drafty corners.

5 – Hoya keysii (bottom left)

Why it’s special: Those leaves! Spade-shaped, soft to touch and slightly furry (the technical term is pubescence), this Hoya also shoots out vines that grow in a more upright habit than the carnosas.
What it likes: This one is especially succulent – likes long dry spells, nice bright light and high humidity.
What it dislikes: Dark corners, over watering (this one is particularly sensitive – it will get mushy), direct sun.

General tips for all Hoya Plant Care

  • Never cut the long tendrils! Leaves and flower clusters develop from these.
  • Propagate Hoya plants from stem cuttings or by air layering.
  • Hoyas don’t mind being a bit root bound. Keep in the same pot for years, but remember to fertilize throughout spring and summer.
  • All Hoyas need to be potted in planters with drainage. These plants are very sensitive to too much water, so be sure to use a well draining soil with plenty of pumice and/or perlite.

When is it going to flower already?

It’s hard to predict when these plants will flower, as it occurs when the plants reach maturity. When are they mature? Depends on the growing conditions! But rumor has it that keeping your plant tightly root-bound (in a smaller than normal pot) will accelerate blossoming. Don’t down-pot your plant, though (take it from a big pot and place in a smaller pot) as that can shock your Hoya, a no-no in Hoya plant care.

Hoya Porcelain Flower clusters

Hoyas feature waxy, porcelain-like flower clusters.

And there you have it. Hoya plant care for our five favorite cultivars. Did you know that Hoyas can be made into bonsai? Check out our vining kokedama string gardens! Any tips of your own to share on Hoya plant care? Join the conversation on facebook!

248 Comments

  1. Paula Quin
    May 31, 2015

    Can the Hoya plants be outside

    Reply
    • jesse
      June 2, 2015

      Hey Paula, thanks for getting in touch! Yes, the Hoya plants can be outside during warm times of year (55 degrees or higher). However, when temperatures are dropping low, you’ll definitely need to bring them indoors. When outside, place them where they’ll be protected from too much direct sun. Hope this help!

      Reply
      • Jann
        August 10, 2017

        I got my Hoya off a friend potted it soon after and it has been growing on my side fence for many years with no particular care and flowers all the time (pink).Im no gardener so i love this plant as its tough and beautiful. Queensland Australia

        Reply
    • Paul Wyatt
      February 27, 2016

      I’ve grown Hoya for years outside in Florida, from Orlando north to Jacksonville. They are cold sensitive, but wrapping with a sheet keeps them safe in all but freezing weather. The do well in the hanging iron baskets with husk bowls and simple potting mix. They seem to need bright light to bloom, morning sun or dappled shade only.

      Reply
      • Jesse
        February 29, 2016

        Paula, thanks for these wonderful and helpful tips!

        Best,
        Jesse

        Reply
        • Amy
          October 2, 2017

          Hey Jesse,

          I have a Hoya plant that I’ve had for the past 6 months. Two questions I’ve been dying to have answered.
          1. In terms of watering, what does a “puckering” leaf look like? Should I be looking at the big leaves or baby leaves to see if they’re puckering? Please help give me a better visual of “puckering”!
          2. Some of the vine tendrils are brown at the tips. Is that normal for the vines to go from green to brown or is that a sign it needs water?

          Thank you !!
          Amy

          Reply
          • Sonja
            January 21, 2018

            I have a similar problem, the tendrils are brown and the new leaves keep dropping and some leaves are dying with big patches where the green is disappearing as if the life is being sucked out. I don’t know how much watering is too much. The leaves have tiny indentations on the edges. Is that puckering.

    • Cathy
      September 29, 2016

      Yes! I’m in Ohio and mine thrives and grows like crazy int the months that it is outside on my southwest facing covered front porch. It comes inside late fall and outside around May. I got my first bloom this year happening right now!

      Reply
    • Jane
      November 22, 2016

      I have a Hoya obtava and it is on my front porch in a huge pot

      Reply
    • Mike
      April 18, 2017

      I got my Hoya plant from my mom about 20 years ago. It never bloomed until I returned from her funeral. Coincidence? I don’t think so! I moved the plant from the Midwest where it stayed inside all the time to Florida where it hangs on my patio in the shade. It now blooms a couple times a year, and always on the anniversary of her funeral. She was born on Halloween so it might be a witchy influence!

      Reply
      • Jesse
        April 24, 2017

        Wow – wonderful story. Thanks for sharing!

        Reply
      • Karen
        May 6, 2017

        My brother rescued a Hoya from my aunt’s house when she had to move to a nursing home. He was a particular favorite of this aunt. He took it to work where it flourished. My aunt passed away about a year later. I took a cutting from the Hoya and just kept it in a jar for a while before I got it into a pot. It bloomed in the jar when my brother was diagnosed with cancer. It didn’t bloom again until just before he died. Maybe just a coincidence but I like to think she was sending a message that she would be seeing him again soon.

        Reply
        • dee
          September 14, 2017

          i agree with you karen. i had a gardenia for 2 years, never gave a flower. last june on my mother’s birthday (she passed 6 yrs ago) the gardenia gave me one beautiful flower. on her birthday! then shortly after it died.
          i believe that was my mom sending me love!

          sorry for you loses. take care.

          regards,
          dee

          Reply
          • dee
            September 14, 2017

            and…it was her favorite flower which is why i bought it.

      • Julia
        May 28, 2017

        How beautiful. That really is wonderful. A beautiful gift that I’m sure brings a smile to your face when thinking of your mother.

        Reply
      • Sandy Mills
        July 12, 2017

        Hi Mike,

        My hoya used to belong to my mother and for many years it bloomed on her birthday. After she passed it bloomed on the anniversary of her death. This year for the first time it bloomed 2 months later than usual. Maybe Mom has passed to another realm, or maybe I have come to terms with her passing. Who knows?

        Reply
        • dee
          September 14, 2017

          Sandy, i am sorry for your loss. i had the exact same thing happen to me. my mother’s favorite flower was a gardenia. she passed few yrs ago and i bought a gardenia on the anniversary of her passing (that doesn’t sound right) and for a couple yrs it did nothing. then last june on her birthday it gave me the most beautiful gardenia. was kinda spooky but wonderful. sadly shortly after that wonderful bloom it died.
          i absolutely believe it was my mother saying hello, i love u.

          regards,
          dee

          Reply
      • Sheila
        August 11, 2017

        How awesome that is. I believe it is your mom, I would love to experience something like that.

        Reply
      • Stacie Jeffery
        August 22, 2017

        Mike, that is such a wonderful story and so special, brought tears to my eyes!

        Reply
      • Lauren
        September 27, 2017

        Mike that’s a really great story. Thanks for sharing. We just inherited my husbands Granny’s Hoya plant. We hope to take good care of it.

        Reply
      • Carrie
        November 13, 2017

        Hello Mike,
        It is a strange universe we live in. Coincidence? 80% of the population would say it’s so, but…. My mother gave me (I actually procured one while working in the yard) an orchid that I had for years & years and it never bloomed with the exception the week my mother passed. It was in bloom just the one time and to this day although I am a seasoned grower – plant enthusiast I have never been able to grow let alone have an orchid bloom in my care, Never ever…. The universe runs on chaos and the sometimes a “coincidence” just could be a destiny to guide your heart though the chaos. I like to think it was my mom saying “Within the sorrow life will go on, don’t forget one must bloom’ “Live because time here is so limited”

        Reply
        • Christy
          August 11, 2018

          There are no coincidences. Thank you for sharing that heartfelt story.

          Reply
      • Carol Smith
        January 8, 2018

        What a Wonderful thing !! God is so good to let us know that our loved ones are still ok and with Him !!

        Reply
      • Julia
        March 12, 2018

        I too had my plant, that my mom gave me, for 10+ yrs. And soon after she died, it starting blooming. Coincidence? I don’t think so either.
        Just before I moved, it started to bloom but didn’t complete the cycle. But 6 months after moving it starting blooming again. I finally took the time to find out all about it and discovered that it is very hearty and need full sun to bloom. So we’ll see in the coming months and repotting and better care what Mom has to say.

        Reply
      • Michele
        May 5, 2018

        What a beautiful story! Thank you for sharing!

        Reply
      • Lou
        May 5, 2018

        I believe that your mum sent you a sign and still keeps doing it.

        Reply
      • Christy
        August 11, 2018

        beautiful story, thanks for sharing

        Reply
    • Rhonda
      August 14, 2017

      No I tryed this 3 years ago and it almost died completely . I live in Oklahoma and summers can be brutal with temp ranges up to 115. I placed it on the east side of my house up close to the building where it had a little shade but direct light it did not like it at all it almost died I brought it back in about a month later and it was very unhappy but now is doing well

      Reply
    • Suwaree
      September 7, 2017

      Yes, my Hoya has always been outside, it flowers profusely every year. I hang it in orchid like environment under the roof.
      Suwaree

      Reply
    • Virginia Drake
      November 13, 2017

      I have an Indian Rope hoya which has been hanging outside in the patio under shadecloth. It’s been there for 2 years, including the winter. I live in So. Cal., but the winters can get down to 40 degrees with cold, blowing rain, and this plant has weathered it all, producing flowers and long trailers which are producing new leaves, etc. All the web sites say it’s an indoor plant, but if you have the right conditions (no frost, no direct sun), it can live outdoors. It’s been in the same 4″ pot as originally bought, trailing vines now are over 2 feet long.

      Reply
  2. Elaine
    June 28, 2015

    I have the hoya carnosa “variegate” and I want to know how exactly do I propagate from stem cuttings — do I place in soil mixture or do I root in water? My hoya is in constant bloom, right now it has at least 10 blooms and new ones forming. It is almost 10 years old and it has pretty much been in the same pot — I really do need to repot it but I do not want to shock it, that is why I want to know about propagating it in case something happens to it. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 1, 2015

      Hey Elaine,

      Thanks for getting in touch! Sounds like you have a very happy plant. I’d stick your stem cuttings directly into the dirt, making sure that a few “nodes” (places where leaves meet stem) are under the dirt. Then keep the dirt moist (but not super wet) for a few weeks while the cuttings take. As far as re-potting goes, I don’t think you should be too worried, since the plant is so old and established. It will probably appreciate the extra leg room! Good luck and hope this helps!

      Reply
      • Jenny
        October 5, 2016

        I inherited a 60 year old Hoya from a friend who moved away. The pot she had it in it way to big for my taste. It seams oversized to me. It’s too big to hang and let the tendrils flow like they like. Please help with some advice. It would be so much nicer in some small pots. I want to keep this plant going for another 60 years and give her back to the friend if she ever moves back here.

        Reply
        • Jesse
          October 20, 2016

          Hey Jenny,

          Try pulling it out of the pot and seeing what the roots look like. Though the pot seems big, it might be fully rooted in, in which case you shouldn’t pot it into something smaller unless divided.

          Best,
          Jesse

          Reply
  3. Carole
    July 11, 2015

    Are any part of the leaves or flowers poisonous to dogs or cats. I have a puppy that tries to eat everything.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 13, 2015

      Hey Carole,

      Good news – Hoyas are non-toxic to dogs (and cats!). Here’s a blog post that we wrote up about some of our favorite pet-safe plants: http://pistilsnursery.com/pet-safe-indoor-plants/. Another great reference with a large database is: http://www.aspca.org/. Hope this helps!

      Take care,
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
      • Kathy
        May 28, 2016

        My bird cage was too close to my hoya. My parakeet ate a half of a larger leaf of my hoya plant and OD’d all night , we finally had to put him down. The vet said he wasn’t going to come out of it. So please be aware.

        Reply
        • Jesse
          June 3, 2016

          So sorry to hear of this. Definitely great info for all bird owners.

          Reply
  4. Victoria
    August 20, 2015

    How do I prune my plant? I have it outdoors (I live in Florida) and it grows a lot . The other problem that I have is that it flowers on its back (far from light)

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 21, 2015

      Hey Victoria,

      You can prune back your hoya without worry using a pair of sharp, clean shears or a knife. I’d cut stems just above a pair of leaves. The plant will send out side shoots from leave nodes, so pruning will likely make for a bushier growing habit. As far as the flowers not facing the light, I’m not sure what to tell you – if it’s flowering, it’s definitely a happy plant, so nice work! It’s hard to control when and where these plants bloom, so I’d just let it do what it wants.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
      • Deb
        April 24, 2017

        Hi. My plant is ancient and kept indoors. I repotted it last summer in its same old pot with different soil. It has been in Decline since then and the leaves are very shriveled. A few years back one of my other plants had what I think were scale bugs and upon closer inspection it looks like my Hoya picked them up somehow. I thoroughly washed the leaves and killed the scale bugs but I see they are back with a vengeance. Can I use systemic in the soil without hurting the plant ?
        I inherited this plant many years ago from my mom and it has never ever bloomed for me, however when I repotted it last summer I pinched off a few Vines and stuck them in water and much to my amazement and Delight one of those Sprigs that is still in the water is blooming! That surprises me considering these plants don’t necessarily like a lot of water. Is it normal for them to bloom when they are living in a little jar of water?

        Reply
  5. Dorothy
    August 26, 2015

    About 30 years ago I snipped a piece of Hoya from a family members plant and rooted it. It has been in a 4-inch pot in a bathroom (seldom used for bathing). This year, for the first time it is blooming. Cannot believe my eyes. How is it possible to take this long to bloom?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 31, 2015

      Hey Dorothy,

      Wow! Very cool to hear that your plant has finally bloomed! In my experience, it’s hard to predict when a Hoya will bloom. But, my thought is that if it’s been in the same 4″ pot for the entire duration, it’s probably eager for more space and a nutrient boost. Regular feeding during the spring/summer and bright, indirect light definitely help them bloom more regularly. Hope this helps!

      Best,
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
      • Vinod
        August 10, 2016

        We have Hoya plant from 1998. It gives flowers (one or two bunch) every 3 to 4 years. Then 3 years ago we gave one clipping to our friend. My friend’s plant is flowering every year and gives lots of flowers 9 4 to 6 bunches). It is same plant and we get flowers once in 3 or 4 years and my friend is getting every year. What should we do get flowers every year?

        Reply
        • Jesse
          August 10, 2016

          Hey Vinod,

          The frequency of flowering is based on a lot of factors, including how much light and water the plant is getting, the size of the pot (sometimes root bound plants flower more often) and if it’s being fertilized. I’d chat with your friends and really get the nitty gritty details of how they’re caring for their plant. Take a look at the pot and see how the size relates to the overall size of the plant, and what kind of light it’s getting. Then try to adjust your plant to match what they have as best as you can! Hope this helps.

          Best,
          Jesse

          Reply
          • ollie
            October 6, 2016

            Hello. I have common hoya. It is easy to grow and grows fast with me. There is a trick to make it flower :). This plant loves clay pots and if you want it to flower and grow it other than clay pots just add crushed clay brick. Somehow this makes it flower in a few weeks. PLUS ….AVOID DEADHEADIND SPENT FLOWERS . I hope my trick helps. good luck.

          • Jesse
            October 20, 2016

            Thank you!

        • deborah ours
          April 2, 2017

          Dear Vinod,
          i enjoyed reading your hoya history….why not take a clipping and give it to yourself and see if it starts to flower more than the original plant….a gift of blossoms
          i have a hoya clipping from my mom , the original is from her mom
          i have no flowers, it is three feet tall on a trellis and has horrible bugs every year
          mine has no flowers either…
          but…my aunties always flowered around Easter and the flowers are so worth it…
          i will move mine to a different window, from what I’ve read above- too much direct light might be why…
          hope you have blossoms, and more blossoms soon

          Reply
  6. Antonette Lobo
    September 15, 2015

    I have been growing Hoya carnosa ,indoor and it was a happy plant, recently i discovered mealy bugs on it and some of my other hoyas, cant get rid of them as they keep coming back, i am using soap water and manually picking them, can u help with any ideas?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      September 15, 2015

      Hey Antonette,

      Mealybugs can be very troublesome once they take hold. It sounds like you’re doing the right things. I would try pruning back any parts of the plant that are really over-run (since it’s an established plant, it should put out lots of new growth in spring), and then try swabbing the remaining ones with alcohol and Qtips. While treating, don’t fertilize your plants – they’re attracted to high nitrogen and that will keep them coming back for more. If all else fails, take some bug-free cuttings, and try rooting new plants from them. Hope this helps!

      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
  7. Beth
    October 4, 2015

    I have several hoya, Rubra, Chelsea and a new one that the nursery couldn’t give the specifics it is strange, have dark green heart shaped leaves like Chelsea but has clusters of solid white almond shaped leaves that look like a tropical flower from a distance. Does Anyone know of this variety?

    Reply
  8. Al
    November 8, 2015

    Hi.
    Just want to say I love my Hoyas! I started with a Hoya bella last year that has never stopped flowering. I then bought a second Hoya bella. I now have 7 different Hoyas!
    My problem is that my original Hoya bella has dropped a lot of it’s leaves and some of the leaves are curled on the edges and the leaves appear dull. Some of the branches have actually totally dried up and become brown. This plant is inside near a window and the soil is not dry. I do allow the soil to become dry before I water, since I do not want the soil to be constantly wet.
    What am I doing wrong?
    Thanks, AL

    Reply
    • Jesse
      November 9, 2015

      Hey Al,

      I’ve heard that Hoya’s really love having their roots aerated. We’ve had success watering with a solution of hydrogen peroxide to re-aerate the roots, which helps with the shriveling. Perhaps this would solve your problem. Check out this link for more info! http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/540658/#b

      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
      • Abi
        December 25, 2015

        Jesse can I just say a big thank you – your responses to all the comments have helped me immensely. Your site is fantastic. Will definitely be referring to this site – for plant insights! Big thanks!

        Reply
        • Jesse
          December 28, 2015

          Of course, Abi! Glad to be helpful. Feel free to write in with your own questions any time!

          Best,
          Jesse

          Reply
  9. Beth H.
    November 14, 2015

    I have a plant – similar to the picture -top right. Not exactly though as the leaves are a bit more heart shaped and just green. It does grow the long tendrils on the ends. We’ve had it for years and it’s never bloomed. I transplanted it as it seemed to be overtaking the pot it was in and now it’s not doing so well. Some of the leaves are turning yellow and it’s looking droopy. We do give it plant food – is there a specific fertilizer to give it and is it ok to prune the yellow vines/leaves back?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      November 20, 2015

      Hey Beth – Sounds like you have a Hoya Kerrii or “heart shaped hoya” based on your description – a lovely cultivar! It’s known for being slow growing. If the leaves are turning yellow, it might have been over watered. The larger pot will lead moisture to hang around for longer. I’d do your best to keep it stable and feel free to prune yellow leaves. You should hopefully see new growth in spring.
      – Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
  10. Anita
    November 19, 2015

    About 10 yrs ago, I repotted my now 25 yr old Hoya carnosa in a larger pot because it had become top heavy. Since then, it hasn’t bloomed but has grown tremendously. Now it’s dropping leaves & looks “tired”. I would like to repot with new African violet soil but I’m afraid to do anything as it has sentimental value to me. I’ve read all the comments above & would like to try the peroxide but will have to use the drug store grade because I live where no household grade is available. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      November 20, 2015

      Hey Anita, Sorry to hear that your plant is feeling a bit sad. I think that you should hold off on re-potting until spring, unless you think it’s possible you may have overwatered the plant. If that’s the case, you could try easing it out of its pot and clipping off any roots that are brown or black, and freshening up the soil. I’d imagine that you can dilute the drugstore grade peroxide to an appropriate concentration with water, too! Hope this helps,
      – Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
      • Anita
        November 30, 2015

        Thanks, Jesse, for your help. My plant has dropped more leaves, looks “leathery” & hasn’t had any new shoots for a long time. I’m going to try to remove it from the pot because otherwise, it’s going to die anyway. Maybe this will give it incentive to live!! Merry Christmas!

        Reply
  11. Erin
    November 28, 2015

    I was recently given a Hoya Carnosa by my mother-in-law who inherited it when her mother-in-law passed away over 20 years ago. She seems to think the plant was at least 10 years old then. I don’t usually have the best of luck with plants, usually opting for those that can withstand some neglectful watering, so I am a little nervous about being given the responsibility of keeping this plant alive. It currently lives in an 8″ pot and does seem happy there as it is quite big…it reaches up to 6′ long on some spots. I want to make sure I give it a home where it will be happy and thrive. My MIL kept it in front of a West facing window, and I am planning to do the same, however she did not hang it. Instead she kept it on a stand and kind of wrapped the vines around. I would like to hang the plant as I really don’t have any other option for it. Do you have recommendations for hanging it? I am thinking that providing supports for the vines would not only look nice but keep it supported enough so it doesn’t get weighted down. Thank you in advance for your suggestions. I really REALLY want to keep this plant happy.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      December 3, 2015

      Hey Erin,

      Thanks for writing in! I think that your biggest concern should be creating an environment similar to your MIL’s, as the plant was obviously quite happy there. Ask her about how frequently she watered it – both during summer and winter. Finding a similar light exposure is a great start! Regarding hanging, these plants naturally do wrap around supports when provided, but it should be just as happy having its vines hang free. The choice is yours!

      Hope this helps,
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
  12. Jill Edmonds
    December 22, 2015

    I live in South Australia and have a Hoya in a pot on the veranda.
    It is blooming like crazy after only two years!
    This plant has an interesting history as my father (who is 93) took a cutting from his own father’s Hoya many years ago.
    It grew to a huge size.
    I took a cutting from my Dad’s plant, stuck it in pot and forgot about it.
    I gave cuttings to friends, forgetting that it was a Hoya (told them it was a camellia!).
    Now we all have Hoyas that are blooming this year.
    We estimate that this Hoya’s original plant would be well over 120 years old now!!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      December 28, 2015

      Wow- That’s incredible and inspiring to know that with love and care, the history of a plant can last over 100 years.

      Thanks for sharing!
      Jesse

      Reply
    • Karen May
      June 17, 2016

      Wow, 120 yrs! Mine’s a happy camper too. I put him out in the perfect Ohio summers. Mine is on a 12″ by 24″ and 3″high platform with a trellis attached and a 6″ pot with a saucer.I just keep guiding the new growth up and down the trellis. Basically I top dress him each spring and fertilize with milorganite (that’s all I use on all my plants; no danger of burning or over fertilizing; that stuff is great!) Mine wants to bloom the backside too, I just spin him around every couple weeks. Probably the best investment I made was a soil tester for moisture. It also helps airiate the pot bound roots. I never realized how seldom I have to water any of my plants!

      Reply
  13. Taylor
    December 27, 2015

    Hello! I was given a Hoya from my grandmother and I put it in the trunk of my car and when I got home I forgot to take it out! It spent the night in 16 degree weather! I can’t believe I forgot about it in there. I brought it in and am wondering if it will die. Or if there is anything I can do to prevent it from dying. Major tears shed. Can you help???

    Reply
    • Jesse
      December 28, 2015

      Hey Taylor,

      16 degrees! Brr. The only way to know is to give it some time. There’s definitely a chance that it won’t make it, as Hoyas are tropical and generally unable to survive a freeze. But you never know – it may die back a bit but plants tend to surprise me all the time with their longevity, so just keep tabs on it, give it a nice warm and bright spot, and see what happens.

      All the best,
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
  14. Moira
    January 1, 2016

    Hi there.

    I need help!! I have two macgillivray hoyas and I’m terrified of them!!! I have never had hoyas before. I bought them in September and they seem to be happy – growing long tendrils and leaves. Trouble is, I don’t know where to go from here!! I put a cone-shaped wire frame thing in the pots for them to grow onto, but I don’t know how to train them onto it. I tried to gently twine the tendrils round the frame and ended up breaking the tendril!!! Has that caused a real problem, and how on earth do I get them to twine around the frame? Please help!!!

    I live in Cairns in far north Queensland, which is tropical.

    Many thanks.
    Moira

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 4, 2016

      Hey Moira,

      Thanks for writing in! Sounds like you have some happy plants. You haven’t caused a huge problem by breaking the tendril; it will simply push out another shoot somewhere lower down on the stem and continue growing. Hoyas tend to wrap naturally around their supports over time. This does happen slowly, though. To encourage it, you might gently tie the shoots to the support, which will hopefully involve less bending than actually wrapping. Then, once the plant grows around the supports itself, you can cut away the ties.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  15. Moira
    January 6, 2016

    Thanks so much – I feel much better!!

    Reply
  16. Lorraine
    January 9, 2016

    Hi Moira,

    I have just moved to a new house with hot hot hot temps in the summer, & cold cold cold temps in the winter. I live in north east Victoria Australia. My Hoyas are doing really well, with lots of blooms.
    I have several, and keep them in double pots, one that has the plant in it (plastic) small, to prevent over watering and to keep the roots snug, I then stand that in the slightly larger outer pot which doubles as an insulator for the roots, it also has a nice decorative effect.

    i do the same for my orchids, with similar success.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 12, 2016

      Sounds like a great method – thank you for sharing!

      Best,
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
  17. Trieva
    January 11, 2016

    Hi
    I have a Hoya Carnosa passed from my grandma in Yellowknife, to my mom in Edmonton, to me, an hour north of Edmonton, Alberta. It’s about 45 years old and is 14′ or so at its longest. I moved it this passed October to the bathroom, so I could support it better, with 3/32″ wire rope that hangs about 3″ down from the ceiling. Both rooms face south, but the bathroom window is about 30% smaller, and frosted. It quickly started getting what I thought were flower buds on it, and now has about 8. They’re 1-1/2-2″ long and look kind of like seed pods, but my mom said it’s where the plant would grow more roots if it was touching soil. Who’s right, and if it’s buds, should it be blooming at this time of year? Should I fertilize it, do nothing, or pick them off? A couple years ago, it bloomed for about 8 months straight, but it started blooming in mid-spring.
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 12, 2016

      Hey Trieva,

      They definitely sound like flower buds to me. The buds start as little clusters, which grow larger and will eventually open. I’d leave them be and see what happens! I’ve seen Hoyas bloom all times of year. Something about the move probably triggered it. Don’t be worried unless you start seeing die-back, which might indicate that it’s not getting enough light in its new home.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  18. Kim
    January 12, 2016

    Hi, I have a hoya carnosa which I inherited from my Nanna. It’s been through some rough times, but I’ve finally got it in a spot that it loves and it’s really taking off this spring. However, the only ‘branch’ that has flower stubs on it (which have flowered several times) has broken low down on the plant, and I believe that branch is dying now (some of the leaves are getting crinkly, and the tendril it was growing seems to have stopped growing). What is like to know is, is there some way of taping up the break to save that ‘branch’? Or can I cut it off above the break and put it in a new pot as a cutting? I’d really like to save it somehow, because of the flower stubs.

    I also have a ropy hoya, and just bought one that will have yellow flowers eventually. I love them!

    Thanks, Kim

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 13, 2016

      Hey Kim,

      If the leaves below the break are showing signs of die-back, It’s likely too late to save that branch. I’d just clip it somewhere on the healthy side of the break with a nice clean sharp knife or shears. You might try rooting the cut stem and see what happens, but the buds on these likely won’t develop into blossoms if it roots, since all the plant’s energy will be directed into creating roots. The good news is, since you have such an established and healthy plant, I’m sure it will put out a new stem with buds soon!

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
      • Kim
        March 21, 2016

        Hi Jesse,

        Thanks for your advice. I cut off the branch at the break, and I put the cut branch into water for 2 weeks, then into soil with rooting powder on it, and it has absolutely taken off! The cutting has multiple shoots coming off it along the full length, and has grown quite a few leaves already. The original wilted/crinkled leaves have come back nearly to normal.
        I’m very impressed!

        Reply
        • Jesse
          March 22, 2016

          Awesome! So pleased to hear it.

          Happy gardening,
          Jesse

          Reply
  19. Larry G
    January 31, 2016

    Should the long leafless tendrils be cut off, or can these be used as starters.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      February 2, 2016

      Hey Larry,

      We don’t recommend clipping the long tendrils – leaves and flowers can develop on these long after the tendrils are produced. I’d suggest letting them continue to grow, as you should hopefully see some developments in spring.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
  20. Marylyn Mountford
    February 5, 2016

    I have a beautiful “OLD” Hoya Carnosa that was given to me by my Mother-in Law around 50 years ago; it is in one of the old concrete wash troughs! We have estimated it is well over 120 years old as Nans Mother had it for as long as she could remember…( we lost Nan recently) I have cared fastidiously for it and over the last couple of years have had a lot of trouble with mealybugs , what looks like ‘blackspot’ and a ‘soot’ on the leaves. I have spent hours washing each leaf but to no avail! I cannot move it as it is far too heavy. It has still continued to flower having one section of the plant growing up to 60 flowers at a time; it has birds nests in it and from October I can have a ‘flush’ each month up to following April – May. Hope you can help me……

    Reply
    • Jesse
      February 11, 2016

      Hey Marylyn,

      Wow – Hoyas are incredible, and your story only adds to my respect for the plant! Mealybugs can be very hard to control, and it sounds like you’ve taken lots of good steps already. Manually removing the bugs can be the most effective way, but given the scope of the infestation it might not be realistic at this point. I’d continue to manually remove as possible, but then also spray the leaves regularly with a neem oil solution, and also with an insecticidal soap, making sure to cover all visible bugs (it works by suffocating them). Next, I’d make sure to move all your other house plants far away from this one, as you don’t want the problem to spread! As a last ditch effort, you could dramatically prune the plant back. It would take a while to grow to its former size, but shouldn’t kill the plant, and would make controlling the problem more manageable, as the plant would be much smaller.

      Hope this helps, and best of luck,
      Jesse

      Reply
  21. Moira
    February 15, 2016

    Hi again

    Just wanted to tell you that you were absolutely right!!! Both my hoyas, despite being broken off while I was trying to twine them around the support, are absolutely going nuts. There are shoots and tendrils everywhere and I can’t believe I was so scared of them!!! One of the tendrils I broke off is now going nuts as well – I just stuck it into a pot of soil expecting it to die off, but instead it is shooting everywhere. Thanks again!! And thanks to Lorraine for the tip. I’m going to try that.

    Moira

    Reply
    • Jesse
      February 15, 2016

      So glad to hear it! Happy gardening!
      – Jesse

      Reply
  22. Louise
    March 5, 2016

    What kind of fertilizer should I use on my hoya plant?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      March 7, 2016

      Hey there! Liquid fertilizers tend to work best. Look for something well balanced, with a ratio of 1:2:1. Fish emulsion and liquid seaweed are good choices. Take care not to over feed and always dilute a bit more than recommended on the package.

      Best,
      Jesse – Pistils Nursery

      Reply
      • Penny
        October 10, 2016

        Please forgive the late response of this comment, but I only just now stumbled across your site as I just acquired a new hoya, and was searching for info! But, I have 2 hoya carnosa (sweetheart hoya) separate cuttings from the same parent plant – odd, but one is thriving, while the other has not even sprouted a single leaf in the 2 years I have had them! These came from my aunt, who has the greenest thumb on the planet and she told me a simple formula for fertilizing these plants that has her hoyas (all varieties – evident as her house is OVERFLOWING) with hoyas everywhere, in every light, air flow and temp. Her recipe is very simple: using a VERY cleaned plastic gallon milk jug, she takes the peel of a banana (cutting off the stem and tail), and blends it until it is completely liquid in her Magic Bullet (a blender works also), then removes half, adds water, and blends until this is murky water, She then pours into the jug and fills to 3/4 full with water. Leave top off overnight (to allow tap water impurities to evaporate), add Miracle Grow House Plant full, put cap on and shake gallon until fertilizer until completely dissolved. Fill rest of the way with water. Wait until following day to use (to make sure plant water is room temp), and use as needed. Following same directions with the other half of banana peel. She alternates 4 gallons at a time – always having the mixture and temp ready to use and writes on the gallons “Hoya water only”. She has used this mixture for years! The cuttings I received came from a 40 – 45 year old plant she received when she started a job, and the plant was full grown then, so we estimate the mother plant (hers) is about 50 – 55 years old. And they obviously love what they are being fed at every watering! I just wish I could figure out why 1 is thriving and 1 is just bored – no growth, no die back – just stagnant…..But, they are both in the same light, receiving the same feed as they did before the cutting, everything, Strange!

        Reply
        • Jesse
          October 20, 2016

          Wow! Thanks for the tip. We’ll have to give it a shot!

          Best,
          Jesse

          Reply
        • barbara
          April 10, 2017

          I would like to try this…but can’t figure out what is meant by:
          “add Miracle Grow House Plant full”
          How much Miracle Grow House Plant do you add? What is full?

          Reply
  23. Jean
    March 17, 2016

    Are you plants succulents?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      March 22, 2016

      Hoyas are somewhat succulent. They have waxy leaves that retain a lot of moisture. Some Hoyas are technically succulents, while others are not. Confusing answer, but hope this helps!

      Jesse

      Reply
  24. Josephine vargo
    March 24, 2016

    Mine only booms one blossom. But it blossoms frequently.is there a way to get more blossoms ?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      March 24, 2016

      Hey Josephine – It’s hard to predict how and when Hoyas will bloom, but a few good rules of thumb are: leave spent blossoms on the plant, feed regularly during spring and summer with a balanced, organic fertilizer, and keep the plant slightly root-bound.

      Hope this helps!
      -Jesse

      Reply
  25. Ali
    April 4, 2016

    Hi,

    I recently got the “Exotic Angel Plant’s” Hoya Rubra Variegata and was wondering exactly what of fertilizer (NPK ratio) to use.

    Thanks,

    Ali

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 6, 2016

      Ali,

      I’d recommend a liquid, organic indoor-plant fertilizer. Something with a balanced ratio of 1:1:1 or 1:2:1, diluted even more than recommended on the package should suit your needs well!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  26. Lori
    April 4, 2016

    Yesterday I got a cutting from a Hoya plant that was my grandmother’s, who got her cutting from my other grandmother, who got HER cutting from her sister, who brought a plant back from Hawaii about 50 years ago. I feel so honored to have a piece of this family history and really want to be able to root it. I have two cuttings and put them in water, making sure a leaf node from each of them were submerged. Is this the best way to root them? Or should I put them in African Violet potting mix? I like the water method, because I can see what’s happening, but want to do what will be most successful.

    Many thanks!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 6, 2016

      Wow- What a cool story about the origins of your plants! It’s so cool that hoyas seem to be one of those family heirlooms that live forever. I would recommend rooting directly in a potting medium like the african violet mix, keeping that soil evenly moist (but not drenched) as the cuttings take root. Rooting in liquid yields mixed results, and sometimes the plants will not take to soil after the aquatic roots grow too long. You can try dipping your cuttings in a rooting hormone powder (some also use raw honey) to improve your chances, and yes, make sure at least one node is under the soil.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
      • Marie
        April 25, 2018

        Mine is a cutting from a plant my father had who passed away in 1990. My daughter had the plant and it looked like it was dying so took a cutting off of it. It has been in a pint jar of water extremely root bound since 1992. Blossoms twice a year. the only thing I do is make sure it always has water and a pinch of miracle grow every now and then

        Reply
  27. Marilyn
    April 5, 2016

    I’ve had my curly-rope hoya for 10 years or more. I have a few questions. If I leave it outside what to do with the bugs when I bring the plant back in the house for the winter weather months. I was advised to feed it with all purpose 20-20-20 water soluble plant food. I see in your answer you say something different. It’s always been an inside plant. Recently, it’s been losing a lot of its leaves, always from the same stem. In the beginning I had 2-3 blooms, now for the last 6 yrs no blooms at all. I have her in a morning sun window facing east? Is that the problem. I love my hoya just started rooting more because I was afraid my 10 yr old plant was dying. One more question some of the stems are at least 5′ long. should I be trimming them>

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 6, 2016

      Hey Marilyn,

      – Whenever you bring a plant back in from outdoors, you’ll want to treat it for bugs. You can make an insecticidal soap at home using organic dish soap, warm water and a bit of cooking oil. Or use a diluted neem oil solution. You can find appropriate ratios online!
      – There are lots of takes on fertilizing. The important thing is not to over-feed the plant, which causes root damage and leaf browning. Leech the plant of accumulated fertilizer periodically by fully saturating it with water, allowing it to drain, and then repeating several times.
      – The morning sun in an eastern window sounds great for Hoyas. They don’t mind direct sun as long as it’s gentle. Bright indirect light is best.
      – Rooting some cuttings is a great idea if you’re concerned about your plant’s health. You shouldn’t need to trim the stems but can if you’d like – this should promote new growth.
      – I’d recommend pulling your plant out of its pot and taking a look at the roots, seeing if there are brown or black ones. That indicates damage, and those should be pruned. It’s the best way to get a sense of what’s going on.

      Best of luck,
      Jesse

      Reply
  28. Stacy
    April 6, 2016

    Hi! I really need some help. I have had a hoya carnosa variegata tricolor for about 28 years. It began to bloom approximately 18 years ago when we moved into our new house and it had a better light source. Many years ago I transplanted it and used a soil that I had read was recommended. I kept it in the same location but it has never bloomed again and I never get the pink leaves anymore, either. Several of the vines have died. My husband bought me a pink grow light but I haven’t used it yet. I’m now terrified to try doing anything to it since it seems like my attempt at transplanting years ago damaged it so badly. I would love to restore this plant back to health but know very little about taking care of house plants. I’m attached to it and miss it very much. Can you help?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 6, 2016

      Hey Stacy,

      Hoyas tend to like to be kept slightly root bound. It seems as though they are more likely to bloom in these conditions. Also, since they’re semi-succulent, and prone to overwatering. The fact that you haven’t had blooms since you repotted might mean it’s just not gotten quite cozy enough in the pot yet. The lack of pink on the leaves leads me to believe the plant might need more light. Some variegated cultivars revert to their solid-color counterparts when they don’t have sufficient light. You can always try rooting some cuttings to start new plantlets from the healthy stem tips in order to preserve part of the plant if the mother plant doesn’t make it.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  29. Kelly
    April 13, 2016

    I have a hoya that is nearing 20 years of age. Recently the leaves have started yellowing and dropping off. This was a very full lush plant and now it is getting rather spindly looking. I have tried googling to see possible causes but haven’t found much. There has not been any changes in terms of changing pots, positions etc. I am at a loss. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 15, 2016

      Hmm. Have you repotted the plant at all, or otherwised fertilized it? Some steps I’d try would be watering with a hydrogen peroxide solution to oxygenate the soil, repot and trim the roots, introducing fresh potting soil, and fertilizing your plant. You can always cut healthy stem tips and root these to preserve the plant if it doesn’t seem to be making it.

      Best of luck,
      Jesse

      Reply
  30. Susan
    April 24, 2016

    HELP! I was given a Hoya plant. It has never bloomed but had beautiful dark healthy leaves and strong stems. I moved it near a window with northern exposure, it seemed to do ok for awhile. The leaves have become yellow and crinkled and drop off. The stems are slowly drying up. There is a heater vent in the ceiling approx. 10′ away maybe that was the problem. How do I make a cutting and where do I cut? I love this plant but I’m killing it. What do you recommend ? Thanks

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 28, 2016

      Hmm. It sounds like the plant might not be getting enough water if the leaves are crinkled. Try oxygenating the soil by watering with a hydrogen peroxide solution (you can find instructions for this online). You’ll take a cutting from a healthy stem tip – 3-4″ long is a good rule of thumb.

      Best of luck!
      Jesse

      Reply
  31. Liv
    April 29, 2016

    Is there a specific type of fertilizer I should be using for my Hoya?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      May 3, 2016

      Hey Liv, I’d look for a balanced, organic indoor plant fertilizer. Liquid tends to work best. Liquid seaweed and fish emulsion make great options!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  32. Rosebud
    May 7, 2016

    Hi Jessie, hope it’s ok to ask more questions of you?

    I’ve just bought a wonderfully large obovata but the leaves are very pale almost lime green.

    Is this due to too much or too little light do you think or maybe it needs more feeding…?

    Thanks for your time and love your Insta account

    Rose

    Reply
    • Jesse
      May 11, 2016

      Hey Rose, Thanks for the kind words!

      Unfortunately there are a number of factors that would cause leaves to be a lighter-than-normal shade, including light and fertilizer as you mentioned, but also your watering schedule and soil mix. I’d try repotting with fresh soil, keeping the watering consistent (if not a bit increased, as I notice mine gets pale with thirsty) and in solid bright indirect light and see how it reacts.

      Best of luck,
      Jesse

      Reply
  33. Kata
    May 7, 2016

    About 11 years ago I was given a clipping of a “rubber plant” as a gift for my first pregnancy. This thing grew to epic proportions yet has never flowered. . I now live at the 50th parallel (which is much further south than where I got it from) and a friend tells me I have a hoya. So I’ve had this thing for 11 years, it’s never flowered but it’s incredibly happy; well rooted and oddly enough, I seldom water it seeing how it’s happiest that way. It’s in a bay window where it gets tonnes of indirect sunlight all year round (or as much as we get up here at the 50th). Any suggestions on how I can get this thing to bloom?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      May 11, 2016

      Hmm. It’s hard to predict when Hoyas will bloom, but have you ever fertilized it? That might help. I’ve also heard that keeping them root bound increases the chances of flowering, so if you’re repotting regularly, you might try letting it get a bit pot bound for a year or two and see what happens.

      Best of luck!
      Jesse

      Reply
  34. Sarah
    May 23, 2016

    Hi, you have such wonderful knowledge and advice for these awesome plants. My grandma got her plant from her mother. When my grandma passed away in 2005 we figured that the plant was close to 100 years old and was incredibly bushy and healthy with tons of flowers. Unfortunately, with the care left to my mom and grandma it died within 5 years or so . I had always loved and wanted that plant so recently my mom bought me a baby that’s in a very small pot. I’d really like to keep this one alive and have got some great tips from you. My questions however are; how long should I leave it in its current pot, when I should give it its first ‘feeding’ and how often should i feed it? I’d also like to eventually take some cuttings so I can have multiple plants and would like to know how soon I would be able to do that without risking the health of my baby. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      May 23, 2016

      Thanks for the kind words, Sarah! Hoyas are okay to be slightly root bound, so it’s probably okay in the current container for a while (unless it’s like, really really small). That said, you’d probably be safe to pot it into something 1-2″ larger with nice fresh soil. The fresh soil will count as the plant’s first feeding. You can feed it once or twice a month throughout the summer with an organic indoor plant fertilizer. Don’t worry about feeding over the winter. I’d wait until the plant is established to take cuttings – You’d probably be safe to do so by the end of summer, depending on how much new growth you see.

      Best of luck!
      Jesse

      Reply
  35. kelly
    May 27, 2016

    Hi, I have a hoya that my husband brought with him when we were married three years ago. I have never been good with plants and did not know anything about how to care for a hoya. Unfortunately, I thought it was a good idea to clean up this plant and cut off all the dead looking sticks, which I found out after my husband came home are tendrils that the flowers come from. My husband is quite fond of this plant who he named Dikembe (after Dikembe Mutombo the basketball player). He was not too happy that I cut off poor Dikembe’s “legs”. Is there anything I can do to get the plant to produce tendrils again? I feel just terrible I did this to Dikembe and any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      May 27, 2016

      Hey Kelly,

      Don’t worry! I don’t think you’ve done any permanent damage to your plant. It may take some time, but plant should put out new growth near where you clipped it. Now that you know how the growth appears before flowering, you’ll be better prepared to care for it! Just keep it happy until the new growth appears, caring for it with its usual regimen.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  36. Debbie
    June 13, 2016

    Hi! Just finished reading these helpful comments/responses. I got my 1st hoya curly rope plant last year .. it had 4 blooms on it Very unfortunately – it did not do well outside – I tried several things but it eventually died either due to over-watering or not enough light. I’ve been looking for one for a while and I picked up another curly rope hoya a few weeks ago!!. This time I have it inside my office near a window and it looks very very happy. Leaves are nice and green tendrils growing. I’ve only watered in twice and fertilized once. My question what/where does it look like when buds start to form? I look every day but don’t know what I am looking for exactly. My other question is about watering. I am very wary about over watering. Exactly at what point should I water? When the pot is dry and the plant feel very light to pick up? As an inside plant near a window – would you expect to water once a week – once a month – or even less frequently? THe soil feels just a little moist – the plant is fairly light to pick up. I just watered it and fertilized it last week. Thanks for any advice – really want to keep this one happy!

    Reply
  37. robin
    June 20, 2016

    HI, i have 2 hoyas, one is the varigated and the other is the common green variety.
    The varigated leaves are developing these “dead” spots in them that seem to grow and the edges turn dead, hard and blackened. Hard, dried spots, not soft. What is causing that?
    The green one has developed brown age spots. They just appear in the color, they don’t damage the flesh. It bloomed like mad, all of a sudden, this spring. It looks like a very faint brown rash, evenly spaced over the leaves. No real damage, I’m just afraid that will follow.
    Both plants are about 10 years old and have been in the same pots for 5 years.
    Thank you for any help
    Robin

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2016

      Hey Robin,

      Sorry for the delayed response! The brown spots could be a fungal/pest problem, but also might have to do with water. I’d inspect for pests, and if you rule that out, try watering with a hydrogen peroxide solution, which helps aerate the soil.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  38. Marnie
    June 21, 2016

    Hi Jesse. I hope I haven’t skimmed over the answer to my questions.
    I’ve grown hoyas for years – they bloomed only once-in a south-west window!
    Questions: How deep a pot should they be in? Do you water from the bottom? I do this but am never sure how well the water is reaching the roots. I don’t over-water bit am never sure when they need it! (I think I have some peat moss in the soil which is not good.) Also, some leaves have large dry ivory spots on them. Is this the result of over or under watering? (They’ve been in south windows for 8 years.)
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2016

      Hey Marnie,

      When I pot up hoyas, I always just scale to a size that is slightly larger lengthwise and width-wise – they don’t have any specific requirement as far as depth goes, but if they’re put in a very deep pot, the soil at the bottom will remain wet longer which can lead to rot issues. The dry spots could be caused by a number of factors, but my guess would be under watering. I usually water from above, and then set the pot in a bowl so that it can absorb the excess water afterward for about 20 minutes or so.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  39. JESSICA
    June 23, 2016

    Hi, I was hoping to know if I can repot my hoya Bella while flowering? She is drying up fast and requires water every other day. She is also in full bloom. Would it be safe to repot her now? Thanks for your advise

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2016

      Hey Jessica,

      I think it should be fine to re-pot while flowering, though the flowering may have actually been triggered by the root-bound pot. It stresses them and often leads to blooms.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  40. Joan Brown
    June 24, 2016

    I have had a Hoya for many years. It is outside ( I live in Florida) and has always bloomed and thrived. Now on the long trendles it Has these long things that look like a seed pod, Is there something special I should do with them? I just read all your questions and answers which was very helpful! Thanks Joan

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2016

      Hey Joan,

      It’s very possible that your hoya has gone to seed! I think you should just let it develop and see what happens! Here in Oregon where we can’t keep Hoyas outdoors, we rarely see this happen.

      Best of luck,
      Jesse

      Reply
  41. Brian
    June 27, 2016

    Hi,

    I have what I believe is a “Crimson Prince,” which has not been thriving, and I am grateful for your advice above, which tells me to try a position not receiving direct light. I also think it is time for it to be given fresh soil, although I will not put in a smaller pot (as I had planned to do before reading your article.)

    However, my main question is this: I have a cutting, which was started in a vase of water, which has after a number of years of remaining about the same size, in the same vase, flowered! (The original plant has never flowered, since I’ve owned it.) My question is this: should I put the flowering cutting in potted soil and try to encourage it to grow into a big plant, or just leave well enough alone and see what happens next?

    Also, how long do the beautiful blooms last, and is there anything people do to preserve them (dry, for example?)
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2016

      Hey Brian,

      Wow – I’ve never heard of a cutting flowering! Very cool. Has it developed many roots? Normally, after a long time in water, the roots become conditioned to staying in water and don’t always take to soil. You could certainly try, though! The flowers tend to last quite some time – a week or two, at least. I haven’t heard of preserving them, but perhaps others have ideas to share?

      Best of luck,
      Jesse

      Reply
  42. Karen
    July 1, 2016

    My grandfather recently passed away and left me a Hoya plant , tricolor I think. This plant is very special to me since it is the only thing he specifically wanted me to have. I want to take good care of it however my knowledge and experience with plants is very minimal. My grandfather inherited the plant from his mom so it is,at least, 25 years old. The plant has been living outdoors hanging in the shade for the last 25 years. It has many straggly tendrils. Some with a few leaves some with many leaves. The leaves themselves have, what appear to be, black spots on the underside, many spider webs and some leafs have tiny white oval bugs on them. How do I begin to take care of this plant and nurture it back to health? Should I repot it? Spray it with horticultal soap for the insects? prune it? Any advice you have would be much appreciated!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2016

      Hey Karen,

      Lovely that you’ll be taking over the care of your grandfather’s plant. I would recommend treating it for pests (the white oval bugs are most likely mealybugs) and removing as many as possible by hand with a cue tip dipped in rubbing alcohol. You can spray it down with water to get rid of the spider webs. I’d treat it with horticultural soap as you mentioned, neem oil, or a combination of both, weekly for a few weeks and see how that goes. Sometimes hoya’s just make straggly tendrils – unless they look truly dead, I wouldn’t clip them. Flowers can develop later!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  43. Nancy
    July 3, 2016

    So how do you know when to repot a Hoya? My sister gave me one as a gift and it’s doing beautifully. I rooted 5 cuttings by laying long runners in soil. I have a cluster bloom on the mother, cluster buds on 2 of the rootings and single buds on a couple of others. The mother has some runners that are 3 feet plus, and the pot is jammed full of growth – can’t see the soil and some new growth is growing straight up. Should I repot now? And root some of the longer runners? Some of them have started putting out tiny roots on the last 3-6 ins. I love this plant. We are currently in the Florida panhandle (it’s on my screened porch) but will be moving to Boulder CO soon. Can it make the move?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2016

      Hey Nancy,

      Wow – definitely seems like your plant is ready for a pot-up, though as you can see, they also thrive when root bound. I think it should make the move fine as long as you protect it from too much heat/sun along the way. The light and humidity in your new home will be quite different than in Florida, so just do your best to give the plant a similar home, keeping in mind that it can’t stay outdoors in Colorado over the winter.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  44. Russ
    July 10, 2016

    Hi,

    I have some newly rooted Hoya plants that are 6 weeks old and doing great. I have been watering once a week. Is that to much at this point?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 11, 2016

      Hey Russ,

      My rule of thumb is that if things are doing great, don’t change what you’re doing! I’d say weekly watering for hoyas over the summer is just fine. As the temperature cools, you’ll likely slow things down a bit.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  45. NCL
    July 14, 2016

    Jesse, this is a fantastic page. I have a 30+ year old carnosa that I manage in my office space. It thrives and blooms more often than not. I had trimmed it back a year ago, and now, there are vines/tendrils coming out of plant again. I’ve set up two strings for the vines to climb on. My question is, now that the vines have reached the end of the strings (to the ceiling), what should I do with them? Should I let gravity pull them back to Earth? I can’t imagine that I trim them, as I suspect they are important for the flowers.

    Again, love this hoya page, it’s my goto. Whenever I give away cuttings, I include the address for this page to help out family/friends who might be hoya newbies.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 15, 2016

      Hey NCL,

      Thanks for the kind words – glad you find this article useful! I say – let the vines go wild! You’re correct that leaves/flowers will develop, so no need to clip them. The vines are sturdy enough to hang freely without breaking, so I’d just let them hang free. Sounds like a beautiful specimen!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  46. Ann
    July 23, 2016

    I just inherited a hoya from my mother’s home that is at least 25 years old, but probably much older, as she inherited it from her aunt. I’ve only seen it bloom a few times and it is beautiful. I’ve take it to a trusted greenhouse for potting as it was originally potted in garden soil.Thank you for the tips and suggestions. I can’t wait to hang it in our home.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 27, 2016

      Lovely! Enjoy!
      Jesse

      Reply
  47. Harlan
    July 23, 2016

    I have a hoya carnose plaint. I have been plaint the leafs in I the dirt and they grow. Is it ok to do this or is there another to do it?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 27, 2016

      Yes, this is a great way to propagate your plant!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  48. Andrea
    July 27, 2016

    Hi there. I just bought a Hoya plant (unknown specific species) a few days ago. The plant has teardrop-shaped leaves that are green with a white perimeter, and some leaves are altogether white. I’ve been keeping it on a windowsill that gets about 3-4 hours of direct sunlight (the info tab with the plant didn’t say anything other than “loves light”!). It had been doing well, but today I noticed it has holes in some of the leaves. I hope I didn’t kill it by putting it into direct sunlight. Do you know what specific species of Hoya this might be? And how I can care for it better? I’m very new to Hoyas!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 28, 2016

      Hmm. Without seeing an image, I’m not sure which species you have. Feel free to send a photo along to shop@pistilsnursery.com, as well as a photo of the holes. Hopefully we can diagnose the issue!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  49. Christine Clarke
    July 29, 2016

    I have just acquired a Hoya Bella plant on a frame and would like to have it growing along a wire over my kitchen window, is it possible and how safe would it be to remove from the framework without damaging the plant?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 2, 2016

      Hey Christine,

      You should be able to remove it without issue. Just take care to do as little damage to the roots as possible while you’re removing it from the framework. That said, some root damage always happens when re-potting, and it should be fine!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  50. elizabeth
    August 3, 2016

    My daughter unexpectedly gave me a very small hoya a couple of years ago (about 6 leaves). It is exactly like your large photo (carnosa with flecked leaves). It started flowering within a couple of months, and has grown continuously. It is by a south-facing double-glazed window (Liverpool, England). If the ‘stalks’ were untangled it must be about 20 feet long for the three main stalks with umpteen side shoots that might take it to 30 feet. Like one of the other people who wrote in it seems to like to hide its flowers. They come randomly almost any time of year in bunches of about 20 small ones and up to 30 of them at once at best. The fragrance is apparent mostly at night. I don’t feed it.
    I never expected it to get this big.
    What I would like to know is WILL IT GROW INDEFINITELY?
    The way I have managed it is to twist it back on itself. I anticipate it will soon look like a solid ‘hedge’. The pot is about 9 inches high and 9 inches diameter. The way it is twisted about its 8 foot high support (I started with one just 18 inches thinking that would be enough) would make it almost impossible to untangle, or in fact move, without extensive damage. I water it about once a week with half a pint, which just fits into its ‘saucer’.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 3, 2016

      Wow – sounds like an incredible specimen! It’s amazing how prolifically hoyas will grow if given the proper conditions. Yes, it will likely grow indefinitely! You can prune it (and propagate cuttings if you desire) but your plant will live a very long and happy life if you continue to keep it happy. That said, you will likely have to re-pot at some point in the future to keep it thriving.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  51. Sue Bookhout
    August 5, 2016

    I have a hoya (Hoya carnosa) that was my grandmother’s. She was born in 1910 and lived to be 100. The crazy thing is that she has that same hoya plant since she got married! I’m estimating it to be about 85 years old! It was very neglected for a couple of years after she passed, but I’ve got it looking quite nice again. Actually, I have two plants now and have some cuttings that have been living in water in a cup on my kitchen counter for a couple years…they are also doing well too. It’s like the Depression era plant that won’t die. LOL.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 9, 2016

      Wow! Sounds like a lovely specimen. Hoyas have the best stories!

      Reply
  52. Bill
    August 11, 2016

    My grandmother brought a Hoya cutting with her from Germany in the late 1800s (don’t know what kind), She willed it to her oldest daughter, (passed in her earliy ninetys) who took excellent care of it and it bloomed often. She passed at 89, her hoya was given, to her next oldest daughter. When she passed, at 69, it went to another sister who was not a plant enthusiast. She put the plant on a basement window sill where it got little light and very little water about three years later the plant went to my mother who receiving the plant in terrible shape nursed it back to health eventually I got it. Didn’t realize what I was getting and left the plant to its own. I was in my mid twenties. When we, my wife and I found out what it was, my wife nursed it back to health but didn’t know anything about blooming. we eventually got it to bloom in our early sixties. we are now both 72 and just recently lost it in a move. have recently purchased 4 all different varieties in 4 inch pots and are starting over. You do the math , don’t have a clue how 0ld that plant is. The up side, my oldest daughter got a cutting off my plant and has just sent me a cutting off her plant so, I guess it still lives on for how long, WHO KNOWS. Thanks for all the info you have given out.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 15, 2016

      Wow! It’s amazing the histories hidden in these plants! Best of luck with your new hoya babies.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  53. Patty jacobsen
    August 14, 2016

    Where can I buy a Hoya carnosa? I live in Titusville, Florida. Do I have to go to a nursery ?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 15, 2016

      Hey Patty,

      Yes, I’d recommend heading to a nursery. Hoyas are fairly common and so you should be able to find one locally. If not, feel free to fill out our custom order request form with a bit more information about what you’re looking for (size, etc.): https://shop.pistilsnursery.com/products/custom-order

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  54. Kolin
    August 20, 2016

    Hello,

    Thank you for all the info about the Hoya. These plants really do live forever. I have a cutting from my mothers Hoya. She has had the same one my whole life and got it from her mother. The plant is older than me(over 30 years old).

    My Hoya cutting is still fairly small but has two flower spurs. In the summer it constantly is blooming. After the first new ones drop, a new set grow right away. Will this continue through out the summer?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 26, 2016

      Hey Kolin!

      Sounds like a great specimen. The frequency of blooming seems hard to predict. Keep us posted if you keep getting blooms all summer!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  55. Rosie
    August 21, 2016

    Hey, I’m so glad you’re still answering questions on this thread! So I was just given a couple cuttings from a Curly Rope Hoya. I don’t know how to root it! So far I dipped the stems in a rooting hormone and have placed in a pot of damp potting soil. What else should I do? Have I done anything wrong? The cuttings she gave me had flowers on them too. It’s such a pretty plant. I don’t want to kill my cuttings!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 26, 2016

      Hey Rosie,

      You’ve got it right! You’ll want to keep the soil evenly moist (but not sopping wet) and maintain high humidity as the cuttings take root. It can take several weeks.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  56. Karen Baker
    August 22, 2016

    I have an ancient Hoya-it was rooted in water from a shoot off my great grandmother’s plant, which itself was probably 50 years old. This was in the 1960’s! I have rooted a number of plants off my original cutting, always starting them in water, which works very well.
    Anyway, do you know what the record for longevity is for a Hoya carnosa? And what do you fertilize them with? I have never fertilized mine, and they bloom about once, sometimes twice a year.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 26, 2016

      I’m not sure what the record is, but there are stories in this thread of plants coming over with great grandparents in the 1800s! If you consider a propagated cutting part of the original plant, my understanding is that the longevity could be infinite!

      I’d fertilize with just a diluted fish emulsion or liquid seaweed, readily available at your local nursery.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  57. Sherry Bingham
    August 23, 2016

    My plant is putting out very long runners. I have it outside in the good months, but don’t know what to do with the runners in the house. There’s no place to put all of it.
    We live in Arkansas. Please advise.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      August 26, 2016

      Hey Sherry,

      Your plant must be very happy! The runners/tendrils shoot out and then leaves/flowers appear later. You could clip them (and root them if you want to start new plants), but my suggestion would be to try to find a place in the house to accommodate the full plant.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  58. Bonita Rankey
    August 27, 2016

    I recently bought a nice potted Hoya in a super-market. I wanted to try propogating it so I’d have some little ones to share with friends. I cut a snip off the solid green stem and a snip off a variegated stem. The solid one is rooting beautifully but the variegated isn’t doing a thing? They both are in the same little container of water. What am I doing wrong?? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      September 19, 2016

      Hey Bonita,

      Hmm. I’d take some more cuttings and continue trying – there’s always a failure rate for propagation, and for whatever reason, some cuttings just don’t take.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  59. steven
    September 5, 2016

    Been reading through all the questions and answers and none seem to refer to my problem. I recently bought a hoya carnosa I believe. Very healthy, but I have had the last three tendrils revert to all green including the stem. I clipped the first one and rooted it (can’t seem to toss a plant away!) The other two I left on the plant. They all have their origin on variegated stems. I only have one variegated tendril of the four. Should I keep trimming off the reverted green ones? Is there any cultural practices I’m doing that might be encouraging the reversion? Too much fertilizer, too much sun? I appreciate your help. -S

    Reply
    • Jesse
      September 19, 2016

      Hey Steven,

      Sometimes variegated leaves will emerge from solid green stems. Plants sometimes revert to their solid form for a variety of reasons, but is most likely due to insufficient light, or a nutrient imbalance.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  60. Shannon
    September 9, 2016

    Jesse, love the information found here. I live on the Texas gulf coast where hoyas love the climate. I have 12 varieties now and this past spring I start propagating and selling on a local fb page. This was just my next step since I love these plants so much. I found very useful information here and would like to give my personal information which may just work in this hot humid climate but it’s what I do with great results. I use either SuperBloom or BR-61 which numbers are 9-58-8 and feed 1/2 strength every two weeks spring-summer. My carnosa’s and hindu ropes have at least 20 blooms at a time and rebloom until around November. The other varieties I have not so many but all the mature ones do bloom. The only one I have ever lost was a wayettii in the winter when I do have to bring them all into my screened porch as nearly all of them seem to not like temps under 50.
    I had never hear of using the peroxide to water and wonder if you think it would benefit my older plants or should I just leave them alone since they do so well? Guess I just want something else to do with them so I don’t keep buying different varieties…..LOL

    Reply
    • Jesse
      September 19, 2016

      Wow – sounds like quite an awesome collection! If your plants are happy, I’d just keep doing what you’re doing 🙂

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  61. Teressa
    September 11, 2016

    I have been keeping my Hoya plant alive for seven years and it has not bloomed in all that time could you tell me why

    Reply
    • Jesse
      September 19, 2016

      Hey Teressa,

      Unfortunately there’s no sure-fire way to predict when Hoyas will bloom. Have you fed or re-pot it in this time? Is it getting appropriate environmental conditions (light, water, etc)?

      Jesse

      Reply
  62. Anita C.
    September 17, 2016

    I love my Hoya. It started with my Grandmother’s plant probably around 75 years ago, which my mother took over, and from which I received numerous cuttings that I’ve been growing for the past 35 years. I moved many times over those 35 years and my Hoya survived all those changes in climate, sunlight, etc. and regularly flowered. (As long as I was happy in life, my Hoya seemed to reflect that by blooming.) I feel like a bit of my grandmother and mom are here with me through the love all of us have put into this plant!
    The sad, bad news is that during the winter of 2009-2010, while I was away from my home in Colorado, a wind storm blew out the pilot light on my furnace, so for a couple of weeks there was no heat in my home. Consequently, my Hoya actually froze and was nearly dead by the time I returned home. I’ve babied it along since that huge shock to its system, 7 years ago, but it has never again bloomed. Last spring I felt it had recovered enough to repot it in fresh soil in a smaller pot, and its foliage has thrived since then. All this spring and summer I’ve been feeding it with a food that’s supposed to promote blooms – but still nothing. It has numerous new leaf shoots at all times, but no blooms. It gets indirect sunlight all day where it hangs in a south facing window.
    Do you think the freezing episode altered the plant’s ability to ever bloom again? I sure hope not – it’s beautiful blooms used to make me feel so happy – I so wish to see them again! Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      September 19, 2016

      Wow – Love the histories that come along with these plants. I think yours will bloom again in time! Can’t think of any reason cold would take away its ability to do so.

      Keep us posted!
      Jesse

      Reply
  63. Linda
    October 18, 2016

    You can make your Hoya flower by giving it plenty of bright light in the summer then put it in less sun in the Fall. Like the way Christmas Cactus blooms.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      October 20, 2016

      Thank you!

      Reply
  64. Linda
    October 18, 2016

    I have a Swedish Ivy that bloomed this Fall>>>>> BEAUTIFUL
    didn’t know it bloomed, I guess everything does for seeding.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      October 20, 2016

      Lovely!

      Reply
  65. Max Abramoff
    November 12, 2016

    Hi all. I have a hoya pubicalyx growing on my bedside table and its doing really well. However there was this long offshoot from the propagated portion that had over grown the stake i have for it to wrap around so i thought i would get creative and try and loop it around and start growing downward instead of up into open space. i first tried just positioning it in the leaves to hold it but it kept springing up on me. So i tried a hair clip, planning to force it to hold its position until it took the shape. Howeve the hairclip snipped the tip off of the vine! basically dead heading the off shoot from growing anymore. because i cut the shoot head of the vine, will this portion not flower in the future? also should i cut it back to the closest leaf node? Im in shock still and am kinda freaking out as this is my favorite plant in my collection. please advise.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 4, 2017

      Hey Max,

      I’d just leave well enough alone and allow the plant to decide where to put out a new tendril, rather than clipping it back to the closest leaf node. This sort of thing happens to us on the regular, so not to worry! Your plant will recover.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  66. Kristina
    November 21, 2016

    Hi Jesse,

    Hoya have been one of my favorites since I received a clipping about 8 years ago from one of those sprawling “grandmother’s kitchen” plants you described. This one came from a babushka in St. Petersburg who survived the Siege of Leningrad. Her plant was so enormous it might have been that old! The clipping survived my trip back from Russia that year and it is flourishing. We used to trim it, not knowing that the trendils produce flowers, but this past summer the plant was hidden in a corner on the porch (in Massachusetts) and in its neglect it bloomed!! I now have a second hoya, which I purchased from a nursery at a farmers market, and a clipping from a friend which is probably also a hoya (unconfirmed). The nursery hoya was growing very slowly (barely at all) until I transplanted it earlier this fall, and within two weeks it sent off a long shoot with lots of leaves. The original plant from Russia has been in the same pot since I planted it, and it looks very root bound — the whole surface of the soil is covered with little roots. Is it time to move up to a bigger pot? (Remember, this is the first summer it bloomed — but also possibly because we were over-trimming). I was actually thinking of repotting the second nursery hoya (a second time), but now that I’ve read your website and many of the comments and replies, it sounds like I should wait for the root system to fill out.

    I’m concerned about the third hoya I have. I stuck the clipping in water a year ago and now it has a well-developed root system. I’ve heard that plants grown in water have different root structure than those grown in soil, and I’m worried that if I transplant it into soil I will kill the plant. I added some dilute fertilizer to the water recently, and now there is green algae growing on the roots. Do you have any recommendations for this plant?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 4, 2017

      Hey Kristina,

      Wow, sounds like some great specimens with a lot of history! Hoyas are okay to stay root-bound for a while. They don’t mind it – in fact, some say it encourages them to bloom. That said, if you can see roots on the top of the pot, it’s probably a good time to re-pot (wait till spring). Regarding the cutting, I agree that the plant might not root in soil since it’s got a fully developed root system in water. You can still try to transplant, but it’s a bit of a risk. Luckily, you can always take another cutting!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  67. Todd
    November 21, 2016

    Hi there! I have 12 different species of Hoya and curious about lighting. During the summer they’re fine it’s the winter I’m more concerned with. I know hoyas don’t like fluorescent lights (I had one at work and it eventually died), but what about those plant grow lights they have at the Home Depot or Lowes? They aren’t the same whit light like in fluorescent ones, it has more of a purplish hue to them. Will these work or will they kill my plants (basically am I better off without them)?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 4, 2017

      Hey Todd,

      I don’t think the grow lights will kill your plant – quite the contrary, I think they will assist with the lower lighting of winter. I think that your plants wouldn’t be happy if this was their ONLY source of light, but so long as they’re also getting some natural light from a window, this should only help. Just don’t put them too close (they can burn).

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  68. Jeanne Lauzon
    December 8, 2016

    My Hoya is very large, has bloomed once in 5-6 years. What fertilizer do you recommend, would trimming long tendrils help?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      January 4, 2017

      Hey Jeanne,

      I wouldn’t recommend trimming the tendrils, as the flower clusters often emerge along these. As far as fertilizer goes, we recommend a balanced indoor plant fertilizer. Fish emulsion and liquid seaweed work well. Other environmental conditions (light, watering frequency, how root-bound your pot is) also affect bloom frequency.

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  69. Ryan
    January 6, 2017

    Hi there –

    I have had a hoya carnosa for two years (bought when reasonably established), growing indoors in a temperate region in New Zealand. Last spring/summer/autumn it grew beautifully near the bath/shower by a small west-facing window. It went dormant in winter, and then never woke up from dormancy, even by the time summer arrived (late November here). I ‘panicked’ a bit, fertilised it and moved it to a much sunnier location. It reacted badly and within a couple days many of the window-facing leaves had started to shrivel and brown. I repotted it, adding some coarser soil to help drainage, and moved it back to the original location by the bath. More than a month has passed and I see no change in the plant at all: no new growth, no further shrivelling, nothing – but overall it’s definitely not a happy plant. I tried a second dose of fertiliser, but no response.

    My urge is to tinker with it, but I hear hoyas don’t like that. Any ideas what to do? Should I remove the (20? 30?) brown and shrivelled leaves? Any other ideas?

    Thanks! Feeling sad and frustrated

    Reply
    • Ryan
      January 6, 2017

      When I repotted I moved to a larger pot. Now I’m reading that hoyas like to be root-bound – but I’m scared to re-pot it again!

      Reply
      • Jesse
        April 24, 2017

        Apologies for the delayed response. How are things going? I wouldn’t change pots again. Just be sure not to over-water since there is extra soil space.

        Best,
        Jesse

        Reply
    • Jesse
      April 24, 2017

      Apologies for the delayed response. How are things going? Yes remove brown shriveled leaves. It’s possible the plant won’t recover, but if there are any healthy tips, try taking cuttings to propagate the plant.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  70. Panda
    February 15, 2017

    do u know how tall the Hoyas in the Philippines can grow. I need to know for a project.

    Reply
  71. Panda
    February 15, 2017

    do u know how tall the Hoyas in the Philippines can grow.
    .

    Reply
  72. sarah
    March 1, 2017

    Would you say that the Hoya carnosa leaves are pubescent? Or is it just some varieties of Hoya that produce a funny leaf?

    Reply
    • sarah
      March 1, 2017

      fuzzy*

      Reply
    • Jesse
      April 24, 2017

      In my experience, most Hoya leaves are not pubescent. I have seen some fuzzy-leafed species but I’m not certain if this would qualify. Sorry not to be of greater help!

      Jesse

      Reply
  73. sarah
    March 1, 2017

    fuzzy* lol

    Reply
  74. sarah
    March 1, 2017

    I meant fuzzy leaf, not funny. Sorry

    Reply
  75. How to Grow and Care for the Tropical Hoya Plant | Growii
    March 3, 2017

    […] to Pistils Nursery out of Portland Oregon, the more root-bound your Hoya is, the better chance you have of a […]

    Reply
  76. Bee
    March 13, 2017

    I have a hoya in a small pot that has been there for over 30 years. One by one the leaves are dyeing. Should I cut it back and repot?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 24, 2017

      You can certainly cut back the dying leaves. I’d re-pot it with some fresh soil. It’s probably very compacted in there, and the roots might be having a hard time getting enough water.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  77. How to Grow and Care for the Tropical Hoya Plant | Sproutabl
    April 1, 2017

    […] to Pistils Nursery out of Portland Oregon, the more root-bound your Hoya is, the better chance you have of a flowering […]

    Reply
  78. Cyndi
    April 7, 2017

    I have a Hoya Carnosa. One side of the main plant (the part in the soil) has beautiful long green tendrils and leaves. But the other side has short pink tendrils and white leaves. Is this normal?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 24, 2017

      Hey Cyndi — You probably have a bit of a variegated hoya species in there, as well! It’s probably the carnosa ‘tricolor.’ Luck you!

      Enjoy,
      Jesse

      Reply
  79. jen
    April 17, 2017

    Hi, my tricolor’s new growth is all dark green (stems and leaves). Do you think this means it’s not getting enough light? I have it hanging high in a south-facing window that has a lace panel over it.

    I love my obovata from you guys and it’s starting to take off.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 24, 2017

      Glad the obovata is doing well! I think that yes, you might need more light for the tricolor. Often variegated species revert to green when there isn’t enough light present.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  80. kate
    April 22, 2017

    I inherited 2 hoya from my mom when she passed, and do not know much about plants, but obviously want to keep these healthy. They are outside on a screened in porch in florida, filtered light. One is doing great, but my curly leaf hoya had mealy bugs on it. I treated it a few times with neem oil diluted according to the instructions. The plant still looked healthy, but still had a few bugs on it. So I dabbed all the leaves and stems with a diluted soap and alcohol mix. Now the bottoms of the tendrils look fine, but some of the leaves on the top are drying out and yellowing. Did I kill it and can it be fixed? It is still rather small, so I don’t think it is root bound. I water it weekly and allow the top of soil to dry out first. Does the plant have to be a certain age before it will flower? Mine haven’t yet, although I haven’t had them long, but I’m sad they have not when I read other posts about flowering!

    Reply
    • Jesse
      April 24, 2017

      Hmm. Mealy bugs can do serious damage, so it’s possible that the plant was affected. However, Hoya soil often gets compacted making watering challenging. You could try re-potting to loosen up the soil a bit.

      Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  81. Abby
    May 8, 2017

    Hi, I’ve tasted the nectar from my Hoya plant and it is very sweet. I was wondering if that is ok and if I could make anything out of it?

    Reply
  82. Angela
    May 19, 2017

    Hi Jesse,
    My grandmother gave me a clipping from her Hoya Carnosa when I got married four years ago. Initially it grew quickly, but in the past two years it hasn’t grown at all. In the four years I have had it, it has never bloomed. I keep it in my office at work, on top of a cabinet. Unfortunately my office space isn’t the greatest, there are no windows (fluorescent office lighting only), and the airflow/ventilation is minimal, I’ve been debating taking it home, re-potting it, and hanging it on the porch for morning sun, but I don’t want to shock the root system (she has been consistently potted in a rectangular planter, but we have moved twice since 2015). I occasionally fertilize her, and water only when she has dried out. My other office plants tend to be more needy when it comes to water, so when I water them I will water her lightly. How do I encourage my plant to further grow? I’d love for her to be as long and beautiful as my grandmothers.

    Reply
  83. Lisa
    May 21, 2017

    I purchased a Hoya Lacunosa Ruby Sue in a 6 inch pot from a seller on Ebay. The plant was shipped in 2 days from Texas to Wisconsin. Unfortunately the weather became very cold overnight and the plant arrived barely alive. I did get my money back from the seller, but am wondering if the plant can be saved…..it looks pretty sick like it got too cold and/or was very under watered. Not sure if I should cut it way back to the top of the soil or not…Am new to growing Hoyas and want to try to save it if I can. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    Reply
  84. paul
    May 28, 2017

    I have one hoya carnosa in the same 10″ diameter pot for 20+ years, It blooms 3-4 times a year. I have NEVER fertilized it, water once a week. it gets 6-8 blooms and smells lovely, I overwatered it and almost killed it. LOW MAINTENANCE delight

    Reply
  85. Elizabeth
    June 4, 2017

    I have a hoya carnosa that was given to me years ago. It has come down with mealy bugs which I’ve removed the best I can with alcohol – and once I untangle the plant from the baker’s rack it’s on will dowse with Neem Oil spray.

    Today I’ve wondered if it’s best to take cuttings and start it anew. The plant has strands that are probably eight feet long. It’s still green. It’s still flowering. I wonder about taking multiple cuttings and restarting the plant. I’m a complete newbie with cuttings and restarting. Any advice?

    Reply
  86. Tammy
    June 15, 2017

    I have a Hoya Carnosa Krimson Queen that I’ve had close to 20 years. I repot her every Spring with new potting mix. This year put her next to a North facing window where she gets morning sun. Her leaves have gotten darker because she was in a garden window before and her leaves were turning pale. Now her leaves are getting dark green, and some white-only leaves. Should I remove the white leaves?

    Reply
    • Ethan
      June 26, 2017

      Don’t remove the white leaves, there’s nothing wrong with them they just show up randomly on hoya plants.

      Reply
  87. Sheila
    June 23, 2017

    I have my Moms original Hoya! Love it! I have given starts to my daughter and have started 2 more pots for myself. My question – is the Hoya toxic? I’m concerned about my young grandchildren and my small dog.

    Reply
  88. Cathy Stone
    June 29, 2017

    I bought my hoya carnosa 42 years ago as a tiny 4 or 5 leaf plant when my husband and I were about to marry. It is now two HUGE plants that are blooming and trailing everywhere!
    I put them on my deck every summer for ease of watering and fertilizing. They are getting indirect sunlight.
    The other day, I notice some leaves were getting black spots, the spots went through to both sides, the leaf becoming very thin at the spots.
    Is this a fungus? Or maybe an infestation of some kind?
    I had just put some osmokote fertilizer in the plants a few days prior, but the weather had been very cloudy and wet, so I don’t think it was any type of burn.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2017

      Hey Cathy, Had you used that fertilizer prior, or was this the first time? Over-fertilization can manifest in a number of ways, and it’s possible that the spotting is a result of that treatment. Hope this helps!
      Jesse

      Reply
  89. Bev Stellges
    July 2, 2017

    I have had my Hoya for over 40 years. However, now the whole underneath side of the plant has “miles” of vines twisted around in circles with no leaves. Do I leave the plant as is? I am going to try to propagate some new ones from the vines with leaves because I also have that mealy bug problem no matter how much I try to eradicate them. Thanks, Bev

    Reply
    • Jesse
      July 7, 2017

      Hey Bev, sounds like a great specimen! It’s pretty common for the vines to develop bare, with leaves developing later. I’d recommend just waiting it out – the leaves should come eventually!

      Best,
      Jesse

      Reply
  90. Be Crosina
    July 19, 2017

    I have had one Hoya for over 40 years and many many more that I have started and given to friends. In fact I have them in several rooms in the house and 2 outside for the summer. This past month, every single on has developed hundreds of little yellow balls on them , In fact even the one that is in bloom is covered with it. I am pretty sure they are not insects but I have no idea what they are or what to do with them. Please help as the oldest one especially is like an old friend.
    thank you.

    Reply
  91. Mckenna
    July 25, 2017

    I bought hoya seeds and they sprout already. They are about 2 inches tall now. They have 4 leaves on each of them but dont seem to be growing as quickly. Any sugestions to keep them growing to adult plants. I have tried growing them 3 times and this is the luckiest i have been so i want to keep them going strong.

    Reply
  92. Mary
    July 27, 2017

    I have a Hoya plant that was given to me over 30 years ago. It came from a family friends plant that was very old. It is growing like wild fire. It has been flowering for the last 7 years. Mine just this year has been flowering none stop. 10 and 12 clumps of flowers at a time. It’s just the most beautiful sight. I have pots all over my home..
    Wish my mom could has seen the flowers, hers never bloomed..

    Reply
  93. Lori
    August 4, 2017

    I have a very large hoya which I inherited from someone at work who retired many years ago. It bloomed regularly for many years in two different offices but has now stopped blooming. I have never repotted it and am not sure how I could due to it’s size (it hangs probably 4′-5′ long). Any ideas? Also when you mention fertilizer, what ratios are you recommending in the fertilizer? Thanks!!

    Reply
  94. Naomi Black
    September 11, 2017

    Dear hoya people: I have a beauty grown from a cutting maybe 4 years ago now. The parent plant was about another 6 years older, bought in a pot full grown, so mine isn’t that old yet. The parent had filled an apartment room with vine, all of it seeming to be flowering – sweet almost overpowering scent from pink composite flowers. I was told to feed it black tea as it would give it the acid soil it preferred. So I have done so religiously ever since it was planted (I’d rooted the twig in water as usual, not knowing better). I can’t get any clear message from all these comments about how to encourage blossoms.

    I should stress that my hoya is really happy on a semi-shaded windowsill and I don’t want do anything at all risky.

    Naomi

    Reply
  95. Ruth Kaplan-Kramer
    September 15, 2017

    I have a hoya cutting I got from a friend. It has rooted nicely in water and I want to plant it. I was going to put it in a terra cotta pot with a trellis so that it could stay in the same pot for years. I have many other plants on shelves in an East facing window and I was going to put it on the floor next to the shelves. I want to use the trellis for the tendrils to grow around to keep them off the other plants. Is this a good idea?
    I have recently potted a group of succulents purchased in tiny pots. I researched soil recipes on line and ended up with a mix of succulent soil, coarse sand and perlite. It is too soon to tell if the plants are thriving in this soil but they have not died. My research turned up another idea: to put activated charcoal in the bottom of the pot. I could not find activated charcoal and was told in the fish supply department of a pet store that activated carbon is used instead so I put that in the bottom of my succulent planters.
    Do you think the same soil mix would be good for hoyas? It is supposed to drain well so the roots don’t rot. I still have most of a bag of succulent and cactus soil and another of orchid soil and was wondering if I could use either of those instead of African violet soil, which I probably won’t use for many years until I need to repot the hoya. I was going to use a pot big enough to support the trellis but think it might be too big for a small cutting. What is a good size pot to start with that won’t need repotting for a long time?

    Reply
  96. Ruth K.
    September 15, 2017

    Some more tips from the succulent care websites:
    Use a ceramic pot with a hole in the bottom (available on line from bonzaijack.com and at some garden centers)
    Cover the hole with a piece of the plastic tape sold for repairs of dry wall. It has adhesive on the back to keep it in place and will keep the soil from coming out of the bottom without interfering with the drainage.
    Start with a bottom layer of lava rock, then a layer of activated carbon.
    Everyone has their own recipe for mixing potting soil for succulents. I combined several and came up with this recipe: 4 parts potting soil, 1 part coarse sand, 5 parts perlite or pumice. Do not use vermiculite or peat or soil that says on the bag that it retains water longer than other soil. For cactus, use a little more sand and perlite.

    Reply
  97. Ruth K.
    September 15, 2017

    When I asked about using succulent soil for my hoya in my first comment, I was referring to a bag of purchased succulent and cactus soil, not to my own mix. I have most of a small bag left and would like to use it before I buy a bag of African violet soil that I won’t use again. I have given up on African violets for now because they don’t do well in this house.

    Reply
  98. freda wolfe
    September 20, 2017

    Hi Karen…I got 6 little straggly crinkle hoyas 3 years ago. Nursed them to health the first year, then repotted them the second year. Now in their third year I have the most amazing plant……some vines about 5 ft long, others vary. Been rewarding to watch these grow..now waiting for the ultimate prize of a flower!! Recently picked up 3 carnosas and now to watch them thrive. I live on Vancouver Island, Bc, so keeping plants well through our winters can be a challenge but have southwest exposure which helps!

    Reply
  99. Jean
    October 2, 2017

    Hello,

    I live in Penzance, Cornwall, UK.
    2 years ago I grew from a cutting a beautiful Hoya Carnosa.

    She has just produced one most beautiful perfect flower.

    My problem is that she has produced many tiny flowers already but before they get bigger than a pinhead they turn yellow and drop off. The leaves are all perfect.

    Has anyone any advice for me please?

    Yours,
    Jean Cowsill

    Reply
  100. Jean
    October 2, 2017

    Hello,

    I live in Penzance, Cornwall, UK.
    2 years ago I grew from a cutting a beautiful Hoya Carnosa.

    She has just produced one most beautiful perfect flower.

    My problem is that she has produced many tiny flowers already but before they get bigger than a pinhead they turn yellow and drop off. The leaves are all perfect.

    Has anyone any advice for me please?

    I attach a photo

    Yours,
    Jean Cowsill

    Reply
  101. Jodie Bassett
    November 5, 2017

    I recently went to USF plant sale and purchased a Hoya Latifolia plant. It was in 4 ft. pot and had a wired hanger. I brought it home and cause the water came out of the bottom on my floor, I repotted it in a 5 ft. pot and changed the soil. Since then, it has lost about 8 leaves on it from turning yellow and then falling off. Did I overwater it and what should I do in the future? Should I leave it alone and see or put it in a smaller pot. Please help me, cause I am concerned about this watering thing with Hoyas. Thanks,

    Jodie Bassett

    Reply
  102. Ann Marini
    December 9, 2017

    My Hoya plant came from a plant my Mother had, which came from her Mother’s hoya. I remember this plant in my Gramma’s kitchen window in 2 small 8″ pots, never repotted, so dense that we could barely see light from the 4ft long window. It would blossom in Spring with too many to count. We estimate that plant & it’s offspring to be over 100 years old! All these plants love east windows & don’t tolerate any other site. I water & fertilize when I think about it ( I’m kind of a lazy gardener) and it doesn’t seem to care. This plant always makes me smile, especially when I smell the beautiful scent of the blossoms, which reminds me of my Gramma’s kitchen,

    Reply
  103. Monique
    January 14, 2018

    I need help please!!! I have a wax plant that I propagated from a cutting many years ago. The plant has been doing great for about 16 years! Until…we moved, and I placed it in a three season porch during summer. Then I repotted it because it hadn’t been repotted – EVER (that I can remember). When I repotted it, I separated some parts and placed them in the soil as their own plant to propagate from. Then I fertilized it with Miracle Grow (it was end of summer/early fall) and brought it indoors. Now, It’s not doing well. Nearly all of it has died except the largest part of the plant, but even that has some yellowing/dying leaves. I thought the problem might be the new water, we’re on well water now whereas previously I was giving the plant city tap water that had a filter on it. I’ve recently taken to giving it filtered water from the fridge thinking the water was the issue. I really love this plant and want to save it but don’t know what to do. Can you help??

    Reply
  104. Lori
    February 9, 2018

    My younger sister Heidi bought a baby hoya pant for my mother at a school carnival event when she was in 2nd grade about 1976. My sister was killed in a car accident in 1986. My mother just passed away in January 2018, I now have this plant. It is more than 40 years old, it has never bloomed, until now.

    Reply
  105. Arezu
    February 23, 2018

    Hi there,

    I’ve read through all these comments (a lot, I know) and I cant seem to find a direct answer for this simple question: when exactly do I water the my hoya obovata? I find the soil is almost always moist – like it can go weeks without getting dry. I get nervous sometimes that its not getting enough water (because it has the long kind of tendrils but with no actual leaves on them) and water it even though the soil is kinda damp. Do I actually have to wait for it to dry out completely? This seems like ti could take weeks!
    Also, do you recommend misting the leaves?

    Thanks,
    Arezu

    Reply
  106. Arthur
    March 6, 2018

    I have a Hoya Carnosa in my little plant menagerie. It has flowered for me a few times but then stopped because I disturbed it by repotting. I hope it gets over the shock and again flowers this year! HOWEVER, it is growing unbelievably fast this year. I find it fascinating, and somewhat creepy, to watch as the now 3 foot long tendril (stem?) moves around during the day AND night. The cutting was given to me by a wonderful woman in my office just before I retired 11 years ago. It is something of a “pet” to me. I don’t want to cut the tendril for fear of disturbing flowering, but it is getting cumbersome! Any ideas, anyone? Is it safe to “train” it by tying to something and curving it around??

    Reply
  107. Nadia
    March 25, 2018

    Hello, new to indoor plants here!

    I just bought a tricolored Hoya plant just recently. I live in a north-south facing house with windows in all directions. Where is the best place to hang my hoya? I live in the Midwest (MO) so in the cooler months I am nervous to have in in front of a window! Could I hang it in a corner where it would get bright north east light?

    Any tips would be GREATLY appreciated!

    Thanks!

    Reply
  108. Jesper
    April 7, 2018

    Hey,
    I keep mine in a cold room. 5-10C, during winter and doesnt water it at all. It also gets direct sun in all months but July, but then again sunshine in sweden is weak.. It blooms every year. Its pretty old at least 40 years and the plant was cut from another big adult plant so its genes is proably at least 60 years. Actually once it didnt get water at all for almost 2 years and was fine, crazy.

    Cheers,
    Jesper

    Reply
  109. Janice
    May 12, 2018

    Be sure not to break off the bud after the flower has died and fallen! The same bud opens over and over again and once you break them off they will not flower in that spot again.
    Also… don’t touch the new vines at the end tips! It is sometimes tempting as you want to help it wrap around something, but don’t. If you touch it or it will die off on the end and stop growing.
    Also, make sure it has a cool (not freezing) stage for a few months as it likes to have a “winter stage”. Without it it will probably not flower.
    And yes… it prefers to be root bound.
    Ours has been in the family for at least 60 years and 4-5 generations that I am aware of (more), many babies have been made over the years.
    Not sure of the variety… the one in the last picture with white velvet flowers and all green almond shaped leaves. I didn’t know there were other varieties. I’d like one of each please.

    Reply
  110. Ann Marie Middleton
    May 18, 2018

    Our classroom Wax Plant doesn;t look good. It is in the window. I think it is getting too much sun.

    Reply
  111. Zak Anderson
    May 31, 2018

    Hello –

    I have a window in my apartment that has an opaque film on top of it and indirect light comes through this for about 4 to 5 hours out of the day. Would this be enough for Hoya curtisii, H odorata, H lacunosa? Thanks!

    Reply
  112. Maryam Waseem
    May 31, 2018

    Hi, I have a Hoya carnosa variegata ‘Tricolor’ that I bought on Mothers day from a nursery. I just wanted to know detailed care instructions regarding light and water. I live in a west- east facing housing in Toronto so it does get quite cold and hot.

    Reply
  113. Avril Levy
    June 7, 2018

    I used to do cleaning for this little old lady who was turning 100 years old and she moved into a Care home. So I adopted her plant. Not sure how old it was when I got it but I’ve had it about 7 years now maybe. A few months ago I knocked it over accidently when vacuuming nearby it. Then realized it was very root bound. I got a new pot and some more potting soil and all of a sudden my plant was happy and began flowering lots of flowers more then usual. But the fragrant that emminates from it in the middle of the night is a rather strong smell not the nicest. It wakes me up every night during the flowering stage about 1:30 am. I have to always remember to close the door of the spare room where my plant is before I go to sleep. A very strange plant to say the least.

    Reply
  114. maria
    June 25, 2018

    I have an old thick hoya that grows without any direction. Can I still train it to grow upwards?

    Reply
  115. Jean
    July 3, 2018

    I have a Hindu rope hoya for yrs it has not produced one leaf . It is in the same pot as when i bought it .It is in a south window but protected from direct sunlight. What am I doing wrong. Also I have some hoya seeds but no instructions on how to grow them or what they look like as a seedling can you help.

    Reply
  116. nader
    July 18, 2018

    Can you tell me why the small leaves with red nick and fall down

    Reply
  117. nader
    July 18, 2018

    any problem?? it’s indoor

    Reply
  118. HoraceCox
    July 27, 2018

    Test

    Reply
  119. sunil sharma
    August 2, 2018

    The blog has given a lot of information about Hoya Plants, in it you have propagated stem cutting or air-harvesting plants. At present, the temperature in India is 28 degrees Celsius. Is it possible to propagate this time, I want to plant its plant in my garden…http://naturebring.com

    Reply
  120. Bonnie
    August 11, 2018

    Hello all, just inherited from a neighbour a Hoya plant over 20 years old with with white blooms that smell like honey. Living in Alberta with currently hot hazy days will be outdoors for a bit. new to care but appreciate all the comments here. Will prune abit and perhaps give away cuttings.

    Reply
  121. Joanie
    August 15, 2018

    I have had my wax plant for 7 or 8 yrs but never had a flower What should I do?

    Reply
  122. Aj
    October 2, 2018

    I live in Calgary Alberta Canada, I have 4 hoyas so far, Bella, cargos, bean stock and rope. Their are in a South window with a sheer curtain. So their do not get full sun , Can I turn them after buds have formed as their all growing towards the light ?

    Reply

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